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Webinars On-Demand

Missed a webinar or want to share a learning opportunity? Select Pioneer Network webinar sessions are available on demand.


2014 WEBINARS

Strategies for Implementing A Fall Prevention Program That Works
Dementia Care Soup Series
Dementia Care Soup Recipe: The Stock
Dementia Care Soup Recipe: The Ingredients
Ensuring Residents Get a Good Night's Sleep
The Pivotal Role of Nurses in Assuring Quality and Person-Directed Care Series

Session 1: A Nurse Practice Model for Long-term Care Settings
Session 2: Preventing Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents: Focus on the Role of the Nurse
Session 3: Eliminating the Use of Antipsychotic Medications: It Can't Be Done Without Professional Nurses
Session 4: Teamwork: Nurses and Nursing Assistants Working Together to Provide Person-Centered CareImproving the Dining Experience: Practical Solutions backed by CMS Regulations and the New Dining Practice Standards
Family Matters: Creating Person-Centered Care Partners
Well-being is a Rainbow Flag: Putting Well-being Back into the Lives of LGBT Elders Through Person-Directed Practices


Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

Strategies for Implementing A Fall Prevention Program that Works

Webinar Presented on April 10, 2014

According to the Centers for Disease Control, a resident fall in a nursing home costs on average $9,100 to $13,500. In 2008, Empira, a Minnesota consortium of skilled nursing homes, implemented a program to prevent and reduce resident falls in fifteen of their homes. The Empira fall prevention program is a combination of nationally recognized evidence-based, fall prevention practices and practical applications from the most recent research findings. Empira, however, challenged many of the standards of practice for reducing falls, and in so doing, achieved an average 31 percent reduction in the prevalence of resident falls.

This webinar covered the process and outcomes of Empira's fall prevention program including how those homes became alarm-free, restraint-free, with corrected bed heights (no low beds), no floor mats and the cautionary use of gripper socks. Participants heard how they included the skills,knowledge, participation and commitment of all staff rather than it being a "nursing only" program. Information about how to implement this program and start reducing resident falls in your home was shared.

About the Presenter

Sue Ann Guilderman, Director of Education and Quality Improvement at Empira, has over thirty-five years of experience providing education, leadership and consultation to non-profit and for-profit long-term care organizations. She is a Registered Nurse with a BA and MA in communication and adult education. Sue Ann has been responsible for the education of the leadership, management and direct care staff of Empira's homes and oversaw the implementation of the Fall Prevention Program. She also currently teaches in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota and recently received a Minnesota Care Providers Association award for "recognition of her outstanding leadership in educational programming.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Dementia Care Soup Series: Now with Person-Centeredness!
A two-part webinar series, after which you will be able to create your own recipe for person-centered dementia care with your team, and get cooking on creating experiences of meaning and purpose for people living with dementia and those who work with them. Are you ready to look at what you know and challenge yourself with new ideas that perhaps you have not thought about? Then join us for some time well spent!

WARNING: These are not your normal webinars. We will give you concrete ideas and practical solutions but we want YOU to think out of the traditional stockpot, so we will present in that same fashion. We invite and highly encourage you to organize a discussion group afterward. We will supply the questions.

Dementia Care Soup Recipe: The Stock
Presented Thursday, May 29, 2014

The nationally known dementia care experts presenting these webinars have been asked many times for the recipe for good person-centered dementia care -- and they are about to give it to you.In Part One of this two-part series, they will give you the recipe for the foundation of person-centered dementia care, or, in cooking terms -the stock. You NEED this base. The base is the ESSENCE of the soup. The principle of deeply knowing people -- those living with a diagnosis of dementia and those who support them, is the essence of good person-centered dementia care. In this webinar, the presenters/cooks will explore how you and your team can develop a savory stock by learning and valuing the uniqueness of each person and their relationships with each other, while building a culture of "rampant normalcy" that seeks to restore a normal flow of life that is meaningful to all of us (this is an everyday soup, after all, not a fancy bisque).

Participants in this webinar will be able to:
  • Identify foundational components of person-centered dementia care.
  • Review the importance of knowing who residents are and a process for achieving deep knowing about each resident
  • List some questions for self-introspection as a dementia care provider
  • Discuss with their team how to build a culture of person-centered dementia care
Presenters:
Sonya Barsness, MSG, Sonya Barsness Consulting
Karen Stobbe, In The Moment


Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Dementia Care Soup Recipe: The Ingredients

Presented Thursday, June 26, 2014

Part Two of the series builds upon the stock or base we created in our recipe for good person-centered dementia care. When we think of cooking our dementia soup, what do we add after we have our stock made? The ingredients. The presenters/cooks will give you ingredients to create your own unique "soup" to support each individual and each community. Certain ingredients are essential,such as empathy, perspective, purpose, and presence. It is up to you to decide the proportions of these ingredients and what additional ingredients you may want or need. Just as every family has their own special recipes you will be creating a unique concoction of person-centered dementia soup to support the individuals living with dementia that you work with. The presenters/cooks will walk you through how to come up with your own ingredients to give it your own twist and create your own dementia care family recipe.

Participants in this webinar will be able to:
  • Identify components of person-centered dementia care that build upon a solid foundation of honoring and understanding each individual
  • Review how essential practices of empathy, perspective, purpose and presence create a culture that creates good lives for people with dementia and caregivers
  • Evaluate how a person-centered culture supports people with dementia by responding to their expressions of need and lessening the use of unnecessary antipsychotics
Presenters:
Sonya Barsness, MSG, Sonya Barsness Consulting
Karen Stobbe, In The Moment

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Ensuring Residents Get a Good Night's Sleep

Presented Tuesday, July 29. 2014

Many nursing home and assisted living communities have never considered sleep as an integral part of the plan of care and services provided for the resident despite the fact that a good night's sleep is so important to their well-being. During this webinar, you will learn how Empira nursing homes have reviewed their care practices and have made adjustments that include:
  • Reducing disturbances to nighttime sleep and increasing daytime activities for their residents
  • Encouraging good exposure to light and sun during the day and darkness at night to help keep internal clocks set
  • Reducing daytime napping that robs nighttime sleep
  • Offering different types, timing and amounts of foods and fluids to better enhance wakefulness and sleep
  • Reviewing and sometimes changing medications to assist with improved sleep and wake times
  • You will learn how to "allow" your residents the option of not being disturbed during the night, if that is their desire. By eliminating or minimizing night time interruptions, homes can encourage more of the restorative sleep that residents need to maintain and enhance their quality of life.
  • After the webinar, participants will be able to:
  • Discuss the etiology of sleep and wake and its effect on health, disease and illness.
  • Explain the top 10 disturbances that contribute to residents' sleep hygiene and overall wellness.
  • Identify operational actions and interventions long-term care providers can do to prevent sleep disturbances.
  • Discuss the "tyrannosaurus rex" of the sleep disturbance program: skin breakdown and incontinence prevention.
About the Presenter:
Sue Ann Guilderman
, Director of Education and Quality Improvement at Empira, has over thirty-five years of experience providing education, leadership and consultation to non-profit and for-profit long-term care organizations. She is a Registered Nurse with a BA and MA in communication and adult education. Sue Ann has been responsible for the education of the leadership, management and direct care staff of Empira's homes and oversaw the implementation of the Restorative Sleep Vitality Program.She has taught in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota and recently received a Minnesota Care Providers Association award for "recognition of her outstanding leadership in educational programming."

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Webinar Series: The Pivotal Role of Nurses
in Assuring Quality and Person-Directed Care

All nursing homes have licensed nurses, but what makes their role unique and important? Are their roles to do tasks that nursing assistants usually cannot do such as administer medications and treatments? Have you ever considered the residents' professional nursing care needs and if they were being met? This webinar series introduces you to an evidence-based framework—a nursing practice model which includes person directed care principles-- that can be used to guide the organization and delivery of nursing care in long-term care settings. Using the nursing practice model as a framework, the webinar sessions will target current issues such as reduction of hospitalization and antipsychotic medications for residents living with dementia. The webinar series will conclude with how nurses and nursing assistants can best work together to provide person-centered care.

 
Pioneer Network is partnering with the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing on this webinar series. Each webinar will award one nursing contact hour. The NYU College of Nursing Center for Continuing Education in Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education b ythe American Nurses' Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

Session 1: Held September 23, 2014 2:00-3:00 p.m. EDT 
A Nursing Practice Model for Long-Term Care Settings
Learn about the key components of a nursing practice model that ensures the residents' professional nursing care needs are identified and met in a manner that addresses individual resident direction and how you can apply the model to nursing practice in your organization. 

Presented by:
Christine Mueller,PhD, RN, FAAN, Long-term Care Nursing Professor, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing,Minneapolis, MN.

Christine is a professor and Associate Dean of Academic Programs at the University of Minnesota, School of Nursing and holds the School of Nursing Long-term Care Professorship. Her research career has focused on improving the care of elders living in nursing homes and her research focuses on factors that can influence quality of nursing home care such as nurse staffing, care delivery systems, and the role of the nurse in nursing home culture change. She has provided national leadership on teaching geriatric nursing, with a particular emphasis on using the nursing home setting as a clinical learning laboratory for teaching geriatric nursing. She serves on the board of directors for the Pioneer Network, the national organization promoting person-directed care in nursing homes. Dr. Mueller has called attention to the role of professional nursing in nursing homes that are transforming both environmentally and through clinical and organizational practices to support person directed care. She served on the Technical Expert Panel for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid nursing home Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement initiative. 

Diana Sturdevant, MS, RN, GCNS-BC, Director of Nursing Services,Mitchell Manor Convalescent Home, McAlester, OK

Diana has over 30 years of experience in long term care, with 19 years as a Director of Nursing. She is a Clinical Nurse Specialist certified in gerontology. Diana received her master's degree at the University of Oklahoma College of nursing and is currently a doctoral candidate at OU College of nursing. She was a2011-2013 D. W. Reynolds pre-doctoral scholar. Diana is the immediate past-president of the Oklahoma Gerontological Nursing Association and a founding member of the Oklahoma Culture Change Network. She has also served on the Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes expert panels for reducing unnecessary medications and reducing re-hospitalizations. Diana currently serves on the Oklahoma Governor's Long term care advisory board and the Oklahoma Health Care Authority's Focus on Excellence advisory committee.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Session 2: Held October 21, 20142:00-3:00 p.m. EDT: 

Preventing Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents -- 
Focus on the Role of the Nurse

Learn about how one nursing home successfully prevents hospitalizations of its residents using Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT®) and how the components of a nursing practice model are complimentary to this evidence-based program. 

Presenters:
Christine Mueller, PhD, RN, FAAN, Long-term Care Nursing Professor, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing,Minneapolis, MN.

Christine is a professor and Associate Dean of Academic Programs at the University of Minnesota, School of Nursing and holds the School of Nursing Long-term Care Professorship. Her research career has focused on improving the care of elders living in nursing homes and her research focuses on factors that can influence quality of nursing home care such as nurse staffing,care delivery systems, and the role of the nurse in nursing home culture change. She has provided national leadership on teaching geriatric nursing, with a particular emphasis on using the nursing home setting as a clinical learning laboratory for teaching geriatric nursing. She serves on the board of directors for the Pioneer Network, the national organization promoting person-directed care in nursing homes. Dr. Mueller has called attention to the role of professional nursing in nursing homes that are transforming both environmentally and through clinical and organizational practices to support person directed care. She served on the Technical Expert Panel for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid nursing home Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement initiative.

Donna McCabe, DNP, APRN-BC, GNP, CWCN, Clinical Assistant Professor, NYU College of Nursing. 

Dr. McCabe is a board certified geriatric nurse practitioner and certified wound care nurse. She has spent her career working with older adults in the acute care, nursing home and community settings. She has a particular interest in the quality and safety of care for older adult patients. Much of her advanced practice career has been dedicated to working with nurse quality indicators such as fall reduction, pressure ulcer prevention, and physical restraints.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Session 3: Held November 20, 2014
Eliminating the Use of Antipsychotic Medications:
It Can't Be Done Without Professional Nurses

What do professional nurses bring to the inter professional team that is so necessary for eliminating the use of antipsychotic medications for people living with dementia? Hear about how one nursing home significantly reduced the use of antipsychotic medications and how the components of a nursing practice model helped achieve that goal.

Presenters:
Christine Mueller, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, Long-term Care Nursing Professor, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing. Dr. Mueller is a professor and Associate Dean of Academic Programs at the University of Minnesota, School of Nursing and holds the School of Nursing Long-term Care Professorship. Her research career has focused on improving the care of elders living in nursing homes and her research focuses on factors that can influence quality of nursing home care such as nurse staffing, care delivery systems, and the role of the nurse in nursing home culture change. She has provided national leadership on teaching geriatric nursing, with a particular emphasis on using the nursing home setting as a clinical learning laboratory for teaching geriatric nursing. She serves on the board of directors for the Pioneer
Network, the national organization promoting person-directed care in nursing homes. Dr. Mueller has called attention to the role of professional nursing in nursing homes that are transforming both environmentally and through clinical and organizational practices to support person directed care. She served on the Technical Expert Panel for the Center for Medicare and Medicaid nursing home Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement initiative.

Melissa Batchelor-Aselage, PhD, RN-BC, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor, Duke University School of Nursing. Dr. Batchelor-Aselage is board certified as a Gerontological Registered Nurse and Family Nurse Practitioner, and has 18 years of experience working in long-term care settings. Melissa teaches gerontological nursing in the Duke University School of Nursing's Accelerated Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing program. Her research focus is helping older adults living with dementia in nursing homes improve their meal intake, with particular interest in reducing "resistive" mealtime "behaviors" and use of three different hand feeding techniques. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar (2014-2017), a National Centers for Gerontological Nursing Excellence Patricia G. Archbold Scholar (2009-2011) and Claire M. Fagin Fellow (2012-2014). Melissa maintains her clinical practice as a FNP in Duke Medicine's Geriatric Evaluation and Treatment Clinic.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Session 4: Held December 11, 2014
Teamwork: Nurses and Nursing Assistants Working Together to Provide Person-Centered Care
During this webinar, participants will learn about the characteristics of teamwork between nurses and nursing assistants that are essential to providing person-centered care and how attitudes,beliefs, values, knowledge, and behaviors promote or inhibit teamwork.Participants will also learn about realistic and practical ways in which concepts and behaviors associated with effective teamwork may be routinely performed at work as well as ways in which teamwork between nurses and nursing assistants is associated with quality assurance performance improvement, reduced turnover, increased job satisfaction,evidence based practice, reduced hospital re-admissions, nursing home safety culture, and pressure ulcer prevention.

Registration fee for each webinar is $99

Presenter:
Mary Ellen Dellefield, Ph.D. R.N, Research Nurse Scientist, VA San Diego Healthcare System.

Dr. Dellefield is a Research Nurse Scientist at VA San Diego Healthcare System received her nursing degrees at UCLA and Rush University, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at UCSF.She has worked as a director of nursing, director of staff development,Minimum Data Set Nurse Coordinator, staff nurse, and infection control nurse in San Diego county nursing homes over the past 30 years. Dr. Dellefield's research interests focus on nursing practice in nursing homes, including staffing, quality improvement, care plans,implementation of clinical guidelines, and pressure ulcer prevention.


Hot Topics: CultureChange in Action webinars available at $59 each.
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Moving Past the 3 Bs of a Traditional Activities Calendar
Presented Thursday, January 15, 2015

Bible, Birthday and Bingo are the staples of activities in many long-term care settings along with the daily group activities at 10 and 2. Times are changing and so is our understanding of what people accessing our services need and want from us. Recreation is no longer about just keeping people busy. It is about having a deep understanding of who each person is and attending to their well-being. In this webinar, participants will learn how to transition from a traditional activities calendar to one of meaningful engagement by:
  • Exploring the Domains of Well-being and how they relate to meaningful engagement
  • Explaining how using the principles of Montessori based programming can create an on-going recreation program that appeals to people's interests and facilitates the attainment of their highest practical level of physical, mental and psychosocial well-being.
  • Identifying ways that all disciplines can assist in growing a purposeful, person directed environment.
Presenter:
Kate Waldo, CTRS, Genesis Health Care

Kate Waldo is Genesis Health Care's Therapeutic Recreation Specialist for the Northeast Division where she partners with over a hundred centers to create environments that support well-being and meaningful engagement. Before joining Genesis, Kate was Executive Director at Hearthstone Alzheimer Care in Boston where she created an environment of meaningful engagement that elevated family satisfaction and invigorated resident self-esteem. She also worked as an Organizational Change Specialist at PHI developing educational tools, guiding projects and leading Coaching and Core Team education with The Green House Project and provided consultation to nursing homes, home health and other long-term care providers who were seeking to grow a culture that ensured quality of life, quality of care, and quality of jobs for all who live and work there. Kate has developed and delivered national, state and local educational programs focused on implementing person-directed care, respectful work environments, self-managed work teams, coaching supervision, peer mentoring and inclusion for LGBT Elders.

Hot Topics: CultureChange in Action webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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A Person Centered Approach to Eliminating Personal Alarms and Physical Restraints
Presented Thursday, February 26

Restraint use in nursing homes was once an accepted standard of practice and care. However, evidence-based research demonstrated that restraints cause declines in physical,mental, and psychosocial well-being. As staff came to understand the detrimental effects of restraints and changed practice, the use of personal alarms as an alternative became widespread. Again a new body of evidence has illustrated that personal alarms also negatively impact the safety and well-being of residents. Alarmingly, despite the evidence, use of restraints and alarms continues. A Minnesota consortium of 24 nursing homes has identified that when all personal alarms and restraints were removed, the number of residents who fell, the number of falls that occurred and the recurrence of falls for the same resident(frequent falls) decreased. Alarms create noise, fear and confusion for the person wearing them as well as those around them. Residents and staff experienced a calmer, happier home environment when the alarms and restraints were eliminated. Join this webinar to learn how these homes accomplished the removing of restraints and alarms, what their challenges were and the outcomes they achieved beyond what they imagined. A Director of Nursing from one of these homes will share their journey and answer questions.

Learning Objectives:
At the completion of this webinar, participants should be able to:
  1. Discuss the inappropriateness of using restraints and personal alarms and their impact on the safety and well-being of residents

  2. Describe the evidence that indicates the elimination of restraints and alarms can lead to a decrease in falls, incontinence and skin breakdown and can create a more tranquil, home environment

  3. Identify the operational procedures for removing current restraints and personal alarms and for preventing the use of future restraints and personal alarms

  4. Identify alternate interventions for keeping residents safe other than the use of restraints and alarms.

Presenters:
Sue Ann Guildermann, Director of Education and Quality Improvement, Empira

Sue Ann Guildermann has over thirty-five years of experience providing education, leadership and consultation to non-profit and for-profit long-term care organizations. She is a Registered Nurse with a BA and MA in communication and adult education. Sue Ann has been responsible for the education of the leadership, management and direct care staff of Empira's homes and oversaw the implementation of a Fall Prevention program, which established an alarm and restraint elimination environment. She has taught in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota and received a Minnesota Care Providers Association award for "recognition of her outstanding leadership in educational programming."

Leah Erickson RN BSN
Clinical Administrator, Lake Minnetonka Shores

Leah Erickson is a Clinical Administrator at Lake Minnetonka Shores, a nursing home near the metro area of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota.  She is a 1975diploma graduate from St. Luke's School of Nursing, completing her BSN from Bemidji State in 1992. Ms. Erickson has been a RN in LTC for 31years filling first the position of staff nurse and then the Director of Nursing for over 25 years.  She has been both an adjunct and full time instructor in the Minnesota State College System.

Hot Topics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Using the Dining Standards and Toolkit to Balance Compliance with Honoring Choice, Mitigating Risk and Preventing Accidents
Presented Thursday, March 19, 2015

Learn about the Dining Practice Standards and how to include the whole team to integrate them into everyday living. Stemming from the 2010 Creating Home II National Symposium on Culture Change and the Food and Dining Requirements co-sponsored by CMS and the Pioneer Network, a Clinical Dining Standards Task Force was formed, which released the new Dining Practice Standards in 2011. Twelve clinical standard-setting organizations agreed to the Standards and the Standards are also recognized by CMS. A second Task Force developed a Toolkit of model policies and procedures, brochures for families and residents and other tools to help care teams operationalize the Standards, such as an Informed Choice form. Presented by Carmen Bowman, the facilitator of both the Creating Home II symposium and subsequent task forces, you will learn about the Standards, the evidence-based research that backs them, how they were built upon CMS nursing home requirements and about the new tools now available. This is your opportunity to learn practical strategies to use the Dining Standards and tools to balance your home's compliance with the requirements to both honor choice (Tags 242, 155, 151, 325) and prevent accidents (Tag 323).

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
  1. List the elements of the new dining standards of practice.

  2. Discuss the evidence based research that backs up the new dining standards of practice.

  3. Describe how the new standards coincide with and help a home to be in compliance with federal requirements.

Presenter
Carmen Bowman,
Edu-Catering: Catering Education for Compliance and Culture Change

Carmen Bowman is a consultant,trainer, author and owner of Edu-Catering: Catering Education for Compliance and Culture Change turning her former role of regulator into educator. Carmen was a Colorado state surveyor for nine years, a policy analyst with CMS Central Office where she taught the national Basic Surveyor Course and was the first certified activity professional to be a surveyor also serving on the four year CMS panel that developed the new guidance to Tags 248 Activities and 249 Qualified Activity Director. As a contractor to CMS, Carmen co-developed the Artifacts of Culture Change measurement tool, authored the background papers for and facilitated both CMS/Pioneer Network Creating Home national symposia.She facilitated the Pioneer Network Task Forces that developed the new Dining Practice Standards and subsequent Toolkit. Recently she co-authored The Power of Language to Create Culture, Eliminating Alarms and Preventing Falls by Engaging with Life, and facilitated the first Surplus Safety Symposium. Carmen has a Master's degree in Healthcare Systems, a Bachelor's in Social Work and German, is a Certified Eden Associate and Eden Mentor, Certified Validation Worker and Group Practitioner. She co-founded the Colorado Culture Change Coalition, and with Action Pact has authored eight culture change workbooks plus hosts a monthly web culture change talk show called Conversations with Carmen.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.


QI Closest to the Resident: Engaging Staff to Prevent Avoidable Hospitalizations and Use of Antipsychotic Medications
Presented Thursday, April 23, 2015

This webinar provides the how-to for a simple, potent process of moving QI out of the conference room to the staff closest to the residents. During the webinar, speakers apply QI closest to the resident to preventing avoidable hospitalizations and use of antipsychotic medications for residents living with dementia but the practice can be used for any quality improvement effort. Involving the staff who provide every daycare in prevention efforts brings their timely accurate information about residents' condition, routines, and needs into individualized interventions. Barbara Frank of B&F Consulting will explain how QI closest to the resident positions organizations for the new value-driven government mandates by shortening the amount of time between staff recognizing acute clinical and behavioral episodes in their early stages and the whole team treating them effectively in-house. A team from Seaview Nursing Home in Staten Island, NY describes several mechanisms they use to engage everyone in avoiding the use of antipsychotics. Clare Hays, MD, a Medical Director in Birmingham, AL, will explain what conditions leading to hospitalizations that CMS is considering to be potentially avoidable, the early warning signs of such conditions,clinical interventions that would prevent the situation from becoming acute, and operational practices that can be used to help staff recognize the early warning signs and put these early interventions in place. A team from Wynhoven Healthcare Center in Marrero, LA describes how they engaged staff in tracking and trending to learn causes of residents' distressed behaviors and identify individualized interventions. Barbara will conclude with how-to information for QI huddles and rounding with the staff to prevent avoidable adverse events.

Presenters:
  • Barbara Frank, co-founder of B&F Consulting, Warren, RI
  • Clare Hays, MD, Medical Director, Birmingham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Birmingham, AL, and Medical Director of Alabama CMS Innovation Center Project to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Home Residents, an AQAF initiative
Teams from
  • Seaview Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home, Staten Island, NY
  • Wynhoven Healthcare Center, Marrero, LA

Presenter Bios:
Barbara Frank is co-founder with Cathie Brady, of B&F Consulting. Through learning collaboratives and on-site assistance, B&F helps organizations improve services and outcomes by engaging staff in continuous improvement. They developed their method for engaging staff through a 21 state individualized care quality improvement pilot, Improving the Nursing Home Culture, led by Rhode Island's QIO, and applied it to distressed homes as they supported New Orleans area nursing homes recovering from Hurricane Katrina. This method was used successfully in several regional, state, and national collaboratives, including by 18 critical access nursing homes in four states working with Advancing Excellence to stabilize staffing and improve quality. Through a Pioneer Network Learning Collaborative, 49nursing homes used this method of engaging staff in individualizing care to discontinue antipsychotic use for many residents. Currently B&F is part of the team working with AQAF on its grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to reduce avoidable hospitalizations for nursing home residents in Alabama. AQAF is one of only seven organizations in the nation chosen for the "Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents."Using a quality improvement model with a RN "care pathways coach" at the core, AQAF is on-site at 23 nursing homes in Alabama. B&F is also creating a step by step method for discontinuing use of antipsychotics for people living with dementia, working with LEADER, the culture change coalition in Louisiana, on its CMS funded initiative.

Dr. Clare Hays is double board certified in Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine and is an Associate Professor in the Division of Gerontology, Geriatrics and Palliative Care at the University of Alabama Birmingham, where she has been in practice since 1987. She has been practicing and teaching exclusively in the long-term care setting since 1997. Dr. Hays is a Certified Medical Director and currently serves as medical director of two nursing homes. She serves as an attending physician for both post-acute and long-stay nursing home residents and teaches the principles of nursing home care and geriatric medicine to medical students, internal medicine residents, and Geriatric and Palliative Medicine fellows. Dr. Hays is a past president of the Alabama Medical Directors Association. She is the medical director for the Alabama CMS Innovation Center Project to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Home Residents, through AQAF, which is using a quality improvement model with an RN "care pathways coach" on-site at 23 nursing homes.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.



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Safety vs. Autonomy for Elders: What if Maslow was Wrong?
Presented Tuesday,May 26, 2015

Elder care staff are faced with similar dilemmas every day: The person living with diabetes who loves ice cream and wants to eat it every day; the elder at high risk of falling who refuses to use a walker. How do you balance respect for individual choice and the desire to protect the person from harm? This presentation will explore the complex issues involved in trying to honor the personal preferences of elders within the context of a long-term care environment obsessed with "safety." The rationale for this emphasis on safety is often Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, the pyramid that places "physiological needs" at its base, followed by"safety," then "love and esteem" and finally "self-actualization."During this webinar, we will examine case studies and generate ideas and strategies to help care providers make well-reasoned decisions when the values of autonomy and safety collide.


Learning Objectives:
  • Explore the different meanings of the word "safety" and how it impacts care to older adults.
  • Examine the ethical principles that underlie decision-making for older adults.
  • Consider the challenges that arise when tension between resident safety and autonomy exists.

Presenter:
Theresa (Terri) A. Harvath, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, is a Clinical Professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis. She is committed to improving the health and health care of frail older adults through the integration of theory, practice and research. Dr. Harvath is particularly interested in exploring the complex clinical issues that often arise in the care of persons living with dementia.

Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.


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Light Em Up or Let 'Em Go!
Presented on July 23, 2015
 
Transforming our organizational cultures requires each of us to become role models for the behaviors and attitudes we expect from others. As leaders, only after we take responsibility for our impact, can we expect greater staff engagement, accountability, and true CHANGE. This fun and informative hour-long session will be supremely useful for anyone who: 1) Recognizes they haven't fully reached their full potential as a role model and champion for change, 2) Needs research-based tools for inspiring and motivating colleagues to higher levels of performance and cooperation, and 3) Seeks a clear road to establishing a positive and lasting leadership legacy.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Leaders will identify the key conditions that prevent colleagues from full engagement and the ability to self-motivate.
  2. Leave the session with a refreshed perspective on their roles and impact as workplace champions of the organization's Mission, Vision, and Values.
  3. Leaders will build their skills as workplace coaches, mentors, and supporters of their peers, supervisors, and direct reports.
  4. Examine and practice methodologies designed to inspire "World Class" attitudes and behaviors from the numerous and sometimes, conflicting, personality types found among our staffs
Presenter: Christopher Ridenhour 
As the Director of Employee Engagement and Hospitality Training for a Philadelphia-based CCRC Management Company, Christopher develops and delivers high impact staff education focused on Heroic Communication and Listening, Powerful Caring and Compassion, Aspects of Inspired Leadership, Total Team Commitment, World Class Supervision, among other critical employee competencies. 

For the last 8 years, Christopher has traveled across North America and Canada keynoting and training for Aging Association conferences. He has been featured annually at national conferences including: Pioneer Network, LeadingAge, American College of Healthcare Administrators, American Health Care Association and The National Center for Assisted Living, and The Ontario Association for Nonprofit Homes and Services for Seniors. In June 2015, Christopher was awarded "Facilitator of the Year" by LeadingAge and will be the Master of Ceremonies for the People's Plenary sessions at the 2015 Pioneer Network Conference.

Hot Topics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Pain Assessment in Dementia: One Person at a Time

SESSION ONE: Presented September 22, 2015
$99
Description: Using a lecture format with case studies to provide clinical examples, the content in this session will cover key components of assessing pain in the person living with dementia. Clinically feasible, evidence-based observational tools will be discussed, promoting a team approach to addressing pain in this unique population.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Participants will be able to identify three specific barriers common to health care providers associated with pain assessment in persons living with dementia.
  2. Participants will be able to list behavioral symptoms associated with pain.
  3. Participants will gain awareness of two evidence-based tools for observing and documenting individual pain-related behaviors. 
Participants will be prepared to implement the use of observational tools for monitoring/assessing pain in persons living with dementia.

Hot Topics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Pain Management in Dementia: One Person at a Time

SESSION 2: Presented October 20, 2015
$99

Description: Using a lecture format with case studies to provide clinical examples, the content in this session will cover key components of managing pain in the person living with dementia. This session provides follow up to the pain assessment session. An overview of options for individualized pain care will be provided, focusing on the importance of analgesic trials, communication, and documenting results. 

Learning Objectives - At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
  1. Discuss overarching principles of pain management for persons living with dementia.
  2. Articulate at least two evidence-based non-pharmacological approaches for addressing pain.
  3. Identify best-practice strategies in the pharmacological management of pain. 
  4. Describe the appropriate use of an analgesic trial. 
  5. Competently use a universal tool to enhance communication among health care providers

Presenter: 
Kristen Swafford, RN, PhD, CNS 

Kristen has worked exclusively with the geriatric population in her 14 years of clinical experience in both mental health and nursing. During that time, she walked in the shoes of a mental health professional working with older adults with chronic mental illness and physical disabilities, aCNA, a floor nurse in a nursing home, and a nurse-manager. It was those experiences that propelled her academic pursuits. After completing a geriatric clinical nurse specialist program at Oregon Health & Science University's School of Nursing, she earned her doctorate there,with a focus on person-centered ways of caring for people with dementia living in the nursing home setting. Pain management, delivered in person-centered ways, has been Kristen's passion ever since entering graduate school. She currently contributes as an advocate, educator, consultant, and mom.


Hot Topics: Culture Change in Action webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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The Impact of the Green House® Project and Action Pact's Household Model

Presented: November 11,2015, 2-3 p.m. ET 
Registration Fee: $99

Presenters: 
Susan Frazier Ryan, BSN, MA, Senior Director, The Green House Project
Megan Hannan, MS, Action Pact

Description: 
The Green House model and Action Pact's Household model both provide self-directed living for the frailest among us. Each has unique characteristics, but also commonalities. Households and Green House homes both result in new physical layout, organizational redesign, and resident directed life. 
Join Senior Director of The Green House Project, Susan Frazier Ryan and Action Pact's, Megan Hannan, to gain insight into lessons learned about the process for creating deep and sustainable change. High involvement and serious investment from many stakeholders in the organization is the path to changing habits and systems that create new and sustainable culture. Regardless of the current physical layout, it is essential that cross discipline teams are engaged in the process and able to apply what they learn to their day to day work. Participants will leave this webinar with an understanding about the importance of transforming the thinking of the organization first in order to produce those changed behaviors that result in in quality resident directed living.

Learning objectives:
  • Describe the key components of both The Green House model and Households, noting their similarities and differences. 
  • Recognize physical, organizational and practice differences between institutional models of care and the household model.
  • Understand the evidence base that supports small house models and the positive outcomes that are associated with this new paradigm. 

About the presenters:
Susan Frazier Ryan, BSN, MA, has over 25 years of nursing experience with a predominant concentration in the field of gerontology and Alzheimer's/dementia care. She currently serves as Senior Director of The Green House Project. Her passion for improving the quality of life for elders has been demonstrated in a variety of settings.  Prior to working with The Green House® team, Ms. Ryan served on the leadership team of a non-profit continuing care retirement community, where the organization transformed their culture by assessing industry innovation and outcomes and developing strategic and educational protocols.Additionally, her experience includes leadership roles as Director ofNursing for a nursing home and as a Geriatric Nurse Educator providing grant-funded programs to support deinstitutionalization of community seniors. She has also worked extensively with older adults in a home care setting.​

Megan Hannan, MS is a nationally recognized speaker, facilitator,and consultant in aging, long term care, culture change, and dementia.She has provided insight and support around quality of life, dementia care, leadership, and change facilitation for over 25 years. As an Executive Leader with Action Pact, she works directly with organizations guiding the process of deep change. Megan participates with elders,families and staff to shape innovative and meaningful environments for people living in, and working for long- term care. She has presented at numerous conferences and meetings including the World Congress on Alzheimer's, the International Eden Conference, and every one of the Pioneer Network conferences. Megan was appointed to the Pioneer Network board of directors in 2003, led the education committee for 10 years and sat on the Executive committee for five years, the most recent as the Board President.
 
HotTopics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.

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Creating and Shaping Experiences of At-Homeness

Presented December 17, 2015
Registration Fee: $99

Presenter: Sheila L. Molony, PhD, APRN, GNP-BC, Associate Professor of Nursing, Quinnipiac University

Description: 
What does it mean to feel at home? This webinar will define at-homeness and provide ways of fostering quality of living and thriving in all long-term care and living environments by focusing on specific experiences of at-homeness. The discussion will include actions that can be taken to create, shape and maintain those experiences. 

Learning Objectives:
Participants will:
  1. Define at-homeness and differentiate meanings of home as a place vs. a place-based experience vs. home as a process.
  2. Describe meaningful experiences of at-homeness.
  3. Discuss key action steps in creating and shaping experiences of at-homeness within the current practice setting at the individual level, group level, organizational level and policy level.

About the presenter:
Dr. Molony received her BS in Nursing from Boston University, and her MS and PhD in Nursing from the University of Connecticut. She completed a Claire M. Fagin post-doctoral fellowship at the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Nursing, sponsored by the Building Academic Geriatric Capacity initiative of the John A. Hartford Foundation. Dr. Molony's program of research focuses on the relationship between at-homeness and thriving for older adults experiencing multiple co-occurring transitions (e.g. relocation to a residential long-term care setting due to decline in health or function).



Individualized Care Planning = Compliance with CMS Requirements
Presented: January 14, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEs for nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10 each

Webinar Description
OBRA '87 regulations have not only supported resident-directed living, they have required it all along and now even more so with the new CMS proposed regulations. Do you support residents to continue to "drive" their lives or are you doing "the driving?" Are you creating care plans in disciplinary silos with disciplinary sections or plans that are all about the person? Free yourself from institutional care planning and comply with both current and proposed CMS requirements; learn what the care plan tag requires and what it doesn't; how to meet the requirement to identify and address each resident's highest practicable level of well-being; and the requirement that the person, the resident, lead the planning of their care, choose who attends their care conference and continue to set their own goals as they are able.

Learning Objectives
Participants will be able to:
  1. List what the federal regulations require regarding care planning and what they do not.
  2. Describe why a resident should determine goals for him/herself.
  3. Identify highest practicable level of well-being for residents as required by regulation.

Presenter: 
Carmen Bowman, Owner, Edu-Catering

Carmen Bowman is a consultant, trainer, author and owner of Edu-Catering: Catering Education for Compliance and Culture Change turning her former role of regulator into educator.  She was a Colorado state surveyor for nine years, a policy analyst with CMS Central Office where she taught the national Basic Surveyor Course and was the first certified activity professional to be a surveyor also serving on the four year CMS panel that developed the new guidance to Tags 248 Activities and 249 Qualified Activity Director.  As a contractor to CMS, Carmen co-developed the Artifacts of Culture Change measurement tool, authored the background papers for and facilitated both CMS/Pioneer Network Creating Home national symposia. She facilitated the Pioneer Network Task Forces that developed the new Dining Practice Standards and subsequent Toolkit. Carmen is the co-author of The Power of Language to Create Culture, Eliminating Alarms and Preventing Falls by Engaging with Life, and facilitated the first Surplus Safety Symposium. Carmen co-founded the Colorado Culture Change Coalition and, with Action Pact, hosts the monthly web culture change talk show Conversations with Carmen and has authored eight culture change workbooks including Changing the Culture of Care Planning: A Person-directed Approach. 

Building Community Through Meaningful Engagement
Presented February 11, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of$10 each

Webinar Description
How can you build true community by engaging Elders and the care team in new and innovative ways? Join us for this webinar as we discuss concepts that have worked in our homes to build vibrant communities that promote growth for all. We will discuss new ways to strengthen individualized approaches to protect and honor personal preferences through innovative programming methods. We will also define intentional spontaneity and outline the benefits and discuss how to build flexibility into the day.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify new ways to promote identity throughout the community through concepts such as Hall of Fame Café, Taste of Hometown and Simply Me.
  2. Describe the benefit of "intentional spontaneity" and how flexibility builds empowerment in the community.
  3. Discuss innovative programming ideas that build engagement such as Summer Camps and Elder Vacations.
Presenters: 
Angie McAlister, Director of Cultural Transformation-Hometown, SignatureHealthCARE and 
Linda McDaniel, Director of ClinicalCare-Hometown, Signature HealthCARE

Angie McAllister has worked in healthcare for over 20 years. During this time she has served in various roles and positions including certified nursing assistant and Activities Director. She has worked atSignature HealthCare for the past 8 years and currently serves as theirDirector of Cultural Transformation. In this role she has the opportunity to lead innovative efforts to honor personhood for those living in 67 Signature HealthCARE communities. She is also a EdenEducator and Mentor and has graduated over 300 Eden Associates over the past four years. It is in this role that her passion to restore Elderhood and promote "life" for Elders everywhere becomes most evident. Her love for the Elders drives her to lead others in overcoming obstacles before them that may stunt growth in their journeys. An advocate for Elders all over the globe, Angie strives to create a paradigm in which Elders are restored the freedom to live life to its fullest daily while striving towards optimal well-being.

Linda McDaniel has been a Registered Nurse for 36 years. In that time,she has served as the Director of Nursing, Regional Nurse Consultant,and Area Director of Clinical Services in the Long Term Care setting.She has been employed by Signature HealthCARE, LLC for nine years, and currently serves in the position of Director of Clinical Culture Change for the Hometown Segment. In this role, she has planned and presented many educational offerings. She is an Eden Alternative Educator andMentor.


Palliative Care for Persons Living with Advanced Dementia: 
Why Comfort Matters!
Presented: March 17, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEs for nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10 each

Webinar Description
Comfort Matters™ is a comprehensive, palliative approach to caring for persons living with advanced dementia, developed by the Beatitudes Campus in Phoenix, Arizona. This webinar will describe some assumptions that exist about persons in different stages of dementia and the principles and practices embodied in this approach to their care as well as the organizational adaptations needed in order to support comfort practices in residential long-term care settings. Findings, processes and challenges from adaptation and implementation of the program in three New York city nursing homes will be shared.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe two key features of mild, moderate and advanced dementia.
  2. Identify and describe at least three comfort-focused strategies for people with dementia living in long-term care settings.
  3. Outline key strategies for implementing these practices in new settings.
Presenters: 
Tena Alonzo, Director of Education & Research, Beatitudes and Ann Wyatt, Residential Care Policy & Strategy Consultant, CaringKind, the Heart of Alzheimer's Caregiving

Bio information

Tena Alonzo has spent the past three decades improving the quality of life for people with dementia as an educator and practitioner. Her work has appeared in multiple journals including The Gerontologist, The Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing and The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementia. Tena has served as a CMS technical expert to improve dementia care and reduce the use of antipsychotic medication. 



Ann Wyatt, MSW is currently the Residential Care Policy & Strategy Consultant for CaringKind, The Heart of Alzheimer's Caregiving. Ann has been working with three nursing homes to establish innovative palliative care programs for people with advanced dementia. In a previous position as Associate Director of the Office of Long Term Care, New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), Ann helped to oversee OBRA implementation for HHC's nursing homes. She was a founding board member of the National Citizens Coalition for Nursing Home Reform, of the Village Nursing Home, Inc., of Music and Memory, Inc., and of Ibasho. Ann is currently also a Board member of CIAD (Coalition of the Institutionalized Aged and Disabled), of Sprat Artistic ensemble, and of Isabella Geriatric Center, Inc.


Educating the Next Generation of Nurses in Person-Directed Care
Presented April 14, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10 each

Webinar Description
This webinar will provide specific strategies abouthow to partner with schools of nursing and engage your nursing staff inbeing guides and mentors for nursing students in providingperson-directed care. Learn how your organization can be a place tofoster enthusiasm in nursing students about working in long-term care.

Learning Objectives
  1. Describe four factors thatlead to successful clinical learning experiences for nursing students in long-term care organizations.
  2. Describe how to create person-directedclinical learning experiences for nursing students.
  3. Identify how staff can mentorand guide nursing students to gain the knowledge and skill to provideperson-directed care. 
Presenter: 
Christine Mueller, Ph.D.,Professor & Associate Dean for Academic Programs, School of Nursing – University of Minnesota

Bio information:
Dr. Christine Mueller is Professor & Associate Dean forAcademic Programs at the School of Nursing at the University ofMinnesota. She has worked on many projects throughout her career focused on improving the quality of life and care of nursing home residents.Two recent projects including a study to evaluate quality improvementinitiatives in nursing homes and implementation of a 4-state educationprogram on clinical teaching in nursing homes with a focus onperson-directed care. Dr. Mueller has taught innumerable courses at theUniversity level as well as many workshops and presentations atnational, regional and local conferences. She has served on the PioneerNetwork Board of Directors and most recently as Board President.

Re-Empowering Staff: Direct Care Employees T.E.L.L. their Stories
Presented May 12, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10 each

Webinar Description
In 2012, Hebrew Senior Life instituted the T.E.L.L. (Together Enriching Lives Liaisons) Committee to advance culture change in long-term care. This interdisciplinary team meets bi-monthly for a full day of learning, discussion and relationship building across departments. In this webinar, T.E.L.L. members will talk about their own culture change journeys, how T.E.L.L. has impacted them and the organization and what keeps them going on this road to re-invent long-term care. Webinar participants will learn how to create similar structures within their organizations.

Learning Objectives
  1. Define staff empowerment and discuss the evolution of Hebrew Senior Life's T.E.L.L. (Together Enriching Lives Liaisons) Committee as a model for empowering staff and advancing culture change in long term care. 
  2. Describe 3 basic principles of adult-learner centered learning and why the use of different learning modalities is an important way of addressing differentiated learning needs. 
  3. Compare and contrast the perspectives of T.E.L.L. Committee members and how being part of an interdisciplinary leadership team impacts employees' experiences of staff empowerment and the advancement of culture change in the organization.

Presenters: Susan Moser, Chaplain, Culture Change Leader; Anne Mahler, Clinical Nurse Specialist; Bevan Briscoe, Senior RA; Heather Dexter, LICSW; Rosemary Kard, RA; Marie Alberte Parent Daniel, LPN

Bio information: 
Susan Moser has been the Culture Change Leader at Hebrew Senior Life since October 2012. Her responsibilities include overseeing culture change initiatives, coaching employees from all departments and leading the TELL (Together Enriching Lives Liaisons) team, an interdisciplinary group of employees dedicated to advancing culture change at HSL. Susan provides education for employees on topics pertaining to culture change and person centered care. For the past three summers she has accompanied a group of front line employees from Hebrew Rehabilitation Center's long term care campuses to the Pioneer Network Conference and co-facilitated presentations with staff from a variety of disciplines and departments.

Anne Mahler, GCNS-BC is a geriatric clinical nurse specialist at Hebrew SeniorLife. Anne has worked in the Professional Development department, as well as on the Palliative Care consult team, during the last 8 years. She has had the opportunity for developing and providing formal and informal educational programs for the interdisciplinary team members in the long term care setting. Areas of education include caring for the person with dementia, palliative care, and culture change. Anne has presented at two Pioneer Network conferences, on the topics of "The Journey Transformed: Person-directed Care at End of Life" and "Approaching End of Life Across the Continuum of Care."

The Role of the Medical Director and Attending Physician in Advancing Person-Centered Long-Term and Post-Acute Care
Presented June 14, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times as you'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10 each

Webinar Description
How can we make life better for our elders and others who need care in our long-term care settings? Learn about the nursing home medical director and attending physician's perspective on ways to improve quality, person-centeredness, and individual resident/patient choice. 

Learning Objectives
  1. Define the roles and function of the nursing home medical director.
  2. Define quality and evaluate the barriers to quality care and improvement in the nursing home.
  3. Name key trends in the post-acute and long-term care setting and AMDA's major quality initiatives.

Presenters: 

Jonathan Evans, M.D., Past President, AMDA-The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine
Dr. Jonathan Evans is a full time post-acute and long-term care physician inCharlottesville, Virginia. He is board certified in internal medicine,geriatric medicine, hospice and palliative medicine and is a certifiedmedical director. Jonathan is s member of the Pioneer Network Board ofDirectors and is past president of AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.



Christopher Laxton, Executive Director, AMDA-The Society for Post-Acute and
Long-Term Care Medicine
Chris Laxton has been the Executive Director of AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine since 2013. From 2010-2013, he was President of Life Services Network (now Leading Age Illinois). Chris has worked for not for profit long-term care associations for 25 years where his focus has been on health policy and communications. 


Person-Centered Care Leadership: Meeting theChallenges Together
Presented July 21, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times asyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10each

Webinar Description
Leadership is the single determining factor of whether an organization can makethe leap from an institutional model of care to a person-centered model. This transformation begins with and depends upon the formal leaders'ability and willingness to transform themselves first, then to changethe context of their communities so that others may embrace their owngrowth and transformation. This webinar will provide attendees with anopportunity to address their own leadership challenges with twonationally known facilitators in person-centered leadership. What isthat leadership challenge that is driving you crazy? After you register, send your greatest leadership challenge to info@pioneernetwork.net andit will be addressed during the webinar.
Learning Objectives
  1. Identify twochallenges of leading a person-centered care journey.
  2. Discuss ways that leaders shift their practices to moreeffectively facilitate the growth of person-centered care.
  3. Name one new leadership practice or skill that the attendeewill personally implement.

Presenters: 
NancyFox, Chief Innovation Officer, Vivage Senior Living and DeniseHyde, Community Builder, The Eden Alternative

Bio information
Nancy Fox has been in the field of long-term care for 30 years. She iscurrently Chief Innovation Officer for Vivage Senior Living. Nancy is alicensed nursing home administrator and the former Executive Director of the Eden Alternative and is currently an Eden Mentor and Educator. Sheis the author of The Journey of aLifetime: Leadership Pathways to Culture Change in Long-Term Care, and is currently writing her next book on person-centered leadership.




Denise Hyde, Pharm.D., discovered culture change in 1997 at the ThomasFitzgerald Veterans Home in Omaha, Nebraska. She left the Veterans Homein 2001 and became a Regional Coordinator for The Eden Alternativesupporting six states. In 2005, Denise was hired by the QualityImprovement Organization in Nebraska to do culture change work andMedicare Part D projects. She is now serving as the Community Builderfor The Eden Alternative supporting Eden Registry Members. Denise is one of the founding members of the culture change coalition in Nebraska and has spoken several times on culture change locally and nationally.





What's in Your Bundle? A Communication Map to Engage Staff in Individualizing Care
Presented August 18, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times asyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10each

Webinar Description
With value-based purchasing and bundled payments, providers need optimal outcome and efficiency metrics to achieve regulatory and reimbursement expectations. Yet, it's easy to miss the mark if you don't have the organizational systems and practices in place to achieve positive results. "What's in your bundle of QI systems?" Do your systems generate the quality of communication needed to achieve success? This webinar will utilize a communication map to examine a system of practices (including consistent assignment, interdisciplinary shift huddles, CNAs in care planning, and quality improvement closest to the resident) as a communication network that hardwires preventative person-centered care into day-to-day operations. This map depicts how these foundational practices facilitate communication throughout the organization so that all the staff have a daily way to ensure individualized care and to maximize quality. The webinar also presents how-to tips for implementing this communication system. Join us to make the most of your bundle!

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify a system of four foundational organizational practices to improve communication and engage staff in individualizing care.
  2. Through practical applications and storyboards, describe and share concrete examples of what happens "with" and "in the absence of" this system of practices including quality and cost implications 
  3. Explain how-to tips to implement this communication system in your organization. 

Presenters: Amy Elliot, Ph.D., Research and Evaluation Consultant, Pioneer Network and Barbara Frank, B&F Consulting

Bio Information
 

Dr. Amy Elliot served as the Research Consultant for both phases of Pioneer Network's National Learning Collaborative on Engaging Staff in Individualizing Care project funded by The Retirement Research Foundation. Amy was on staff at Pioneer Network from 2007-2011 and currently works as a Research and Evaluation Consultant for organizations in the fields of health and long-term care. She earned her Ph.D. from the John Glenn College of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University where she currently lectures on policy evaluation and statistics. She has authored research publications, case studies, educational modules, and book chapters that focus on innovative, individualized care models to support long-term care practice and policy.

Barbara Frank is co-Founder with Cathie Brady of B&F Consulting. B&F has served as faculty for national, state, and local learning collaboratives involving over 1000 nursing homes over the last 10 years. They were the Content Leads for Pioneer Network's National Learning Collaborative on Engaging Staff in Individualizing Care. They led a team that supported homes to stabilize after Hurricane Katrina. They focus on the how-to, including how-to implement consistent assignment, eliminate off-label antipsychotic use, and prevent avoidable hospitalizations. Barbara is co-author of Meeting the Leadership Challenge in Long Term Care: What You Do Matters.


HotTopics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.


Improving the Dining Experience: Practical Solutions backed by CMS Regulations and the New Dining Practice Standards
Presented September 15, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times asyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10each

Webinar Description:
Do you want to provide a great dining experience for your residents, honor their preferences and choices and be in compliance with both current and proposed CMS requirements? Be inspired and learn from Carmen Bowman as she summarizes the new Dining Practice Standards and how they support residents to eat foods they want to eat, backed by both research and federal CMS regulations, and the Pioneer Network's Dining Standards Toolkit. Be inspired and learn from Suzanne Quiring about how to work within budget and time restrictions, tackle cold food, high food waste and endless food preference lists issues. Learn how to move away from tray and pre-plate service to self-determined meal delivery that honors resident choice while saving money. Photos, real life examples and many ideas will be shared to help food service professionals implement practical culture change ideas with the confidence of the literature, best practices and federal requirements to back them up. 

Learning Objectives:
  1. Summarize the Dining Practice Standards and how they support residents to eat foods they want to eat, and are backed by research and federal CMS regulations.
  2. Review the top challenges in the LTC dining room for RD/Food managers and residents, and the true limitations of pre-determined tray or pre-plate meal service. 
  3. Explain how direct dining can be done and how to move into this direction with the culture change resources that are available.

Presenters: 
Carmen Bowman, Owner of Edu-Catering 
Suzanne Quiring, Registered Dietician, SuzyQ Menu Concepts

Bio Information:
Carmen Bowman is a consultant, trainer, author and owner of Edu-Catering: Catering Education for Compliance and Culture Change turning her former role of regulator into educator. Carmen was a Colorado state surveyor for nine years, a policy analyst with CMS Central Office where she taught the national Basic Surveyor Course and was the first certified activity professional to be a surveyor also serving on the four year panel with CMS developing the new guidance to Tags 248 Activities and 249 Qualified Activity Director. As a contractor to CMS, Carmen co-developed the Artifacts of Culture Change measurement tool and authored the background papers for and facilitated both Pioneer Network/CMS Creating Home national symposiums. She facilitated the Pioneer Network Task Forces that developed the new Dining Practice Standards and subsequent Dining Standards Toolkit. Recently she co-authored The Power of Language to Create Culture, her eighth book Eliminating Alarms and Preventing Falls by Engaging with Life, and facilitated the first Surplus Safety Symposium. Carmen co-founded the Colorado Culture Change Coalition, and with Action Pact, has authored eight culture change workbooks plus hosts a monthly web culture change talk show called Conversations with Carmen.

Suzanne Quiring is a Registered Dietitian with Dietitians of Canada, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (ADA), College of Dietitians of BC, a member of the Canadian Society of Nutrition Management (CSNM), has her Continuing Care Administrator's diploma, and 20 years of experience in the Long Term Care food industry as a Director of Food Services, Dietitian, and consultant. Suzanne has worked in all areas of Long Term Care from Assisted living, skilled nursing care, palliative care, dementia care, brain injury, and extended care and she has a strong understanding as to the practical challenges of providing great meal service to residents, regardless of care level. 

Suzanne has been published in nine professional journals and a speaker at provincial and state workshops as well as national conferences in Canada and the United States. In 2015, Suzanne was awarded the Marie Taylor Award of Excellence in Long Term Care by Dietitians of Canada.


HotTopics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.


Family Matters: Creating Person-Centered Care Partners 
Presented October 20, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many times asyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of $10each

Webinar Description:
Many discussions about person-centered care that include the family of residents are focused on the challenges of working with family members or how they stand in the way of person-centered care. Not this one! This webinar will explore the importance of creating person-centered care partners out of the residents' family members. The barriers that make this relationship difficult and solutions for overcoming those will be discussed. Individualized care plans and acceptance of risk are critical pieces of person-centered care and you will learn how family partners can be an integral part of these processes. 

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify strategies for building relationships and trust with residents' family members.
  2. Describe how to increase family involvement in the care planning process.
  3. Discuss the role of the relationship with family members in risk and clinical care discussions.

Presenters: Stephanie Gfeller, Long-Term Care Program Coordinator, Kansas State University Center on Aging and Judy Miller, Project Consultant, PEAK 2.0, Kansas State University.

Bio information:

Stephanie Gfeller serves as the Long-term Care Program Coordinator for the Kansas State University Center on Aging. She has a Bachelor's Degree in Family Studies and a Master's Degree in Gerontology, both from Kansas State University, and is a licensed adult care home administrator. Stephanie helps with education development, provider trainings and evaluations for the PEAK 2.0 culture change financial incentive program in Kansas. She is particularly interested in the meaningful life component of person-centered care and sees family as a central piece to meaningful living. Stephanie has served on the board of the Kansas Culture Change Coalition and the Aging Services Transformation Alliance (ASTRA) board. She authored several of the PEAK culture change education modules and Uniting Wonder with Wisdom a guidebook for developing intergenerational classrooms in nursing homes. 

Judy Miller serves as a Project Consultant of PEAK 2.0 for Kansas State University Center on Aging. She is a registered nurse and has a Bachelor's degree in Health Science with focus on management from Excelsior College in New York. Judy assists with the development, education and evaluations for the PEAK 2.0 culture change incentive program in Kansas. She has served in long term care in different roles including 17 years as a Director of Nursing. 



Well-being is aRainbow Flag: Putting Well-being Back into the Lives of LGBT EldersThrough Person-Directed Practices
Presented November 17, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many timesasyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of$10each

Webinar Description
The currentcohort of LGBT elders are those who spent their lives fighting for therights of the LGBT population. Although it was difficult, they wereproud to show their colors. Now, as they find themselves needing care,many are going back into the closet, fearful of being neglected, hurtand/or abused. Society's deeply imbedded negative attitudes against LGBT persons, as well as the aging population in general, are at the core of this issue. Through person-directed practices, we can help them onceagain enjoy the domains of well-being with pride: identity, growth,autonomy, security, connectedness, meaning, and joy. This webinar willclarify these domains and their implementation in the LGBT community.

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify society's past andcurrent attitudes toward the LGBT community.
  2. Define the domainsof well-being and their necessity among the LGBT population.
  3. List two ways that organizations can use person-directed practices toenhance the well-being of LGBT Elders.
Presenters: 
Mel Coppola, Owner, Hearts inCare, LLC, Troy JohnsonFounder, In Focus Counseling, and Marti Smith, Member, Center onHalsted's Senior Voice Program.

Bio information:
Mel Coppolais owner of Hearts in Care, LLC and is an Eden Educator and Mentor. Forthe past 6 years, she worked for a home care company and spearheaded its person-directed care work which led to it becoming the first home careagency on the Eden Registry. Mel has served on the LGBT EldersInitiative of Pinellas/Pasco County since its inception in 2012. Itsmission is to build bridges between elder services and the LGBT Elderscommunity through information, education and advocacy.

Troy Johnson, LMSW, is the founder and a therapist at In FocusCounseling in Chattanooga, TN. He recently served as SeniorServices Manager for the Center on Halsted in Chicago where he workedclosely with LGBT seniors and manages congregate meals, educational andsocial programs. Troy's work includes advocating for more inclusiveprogramming and services for LGBT elders in Central Kentucky as theformer director of the Senior Pride Initiative and Director of Programsand Services for the Nursing Home Ombudsman Agency.


Marti Smith is a resident of Town Hall Apartments, Chicago's first LGBT friendlysenior housing development, and a member of the Center on Halsted'sSenior Voice program. Marti is a sought after public speaker andadvocate for LGBT aging issues and has been featured in numerous localand national news articles.





HotTopics: CultureChange inAction webinars available at $59 each. 
Please contact Pioneer Network to purchase a webinar.



Measuring Intangibles: A Review of Tools to Assess Quality of Life and Well-Being
Presented December 15, 2016

Registration: $59 
Webinar recording can be watched/shown as many timesasyou'd like
 CEsfor nurses are available for each webinar at an additional fee of$10each

Webinar Description
Maintaining and promoting quality of life (QOL) is a foundational goal for recipients and providers of long-term care. Yet, even though QOL is a critical component of each individual's experience, wide variations in preferences and perceptions of care often relegate QOL to a more intangible, subjective concept. This webinar will strive to concretize QOL, as a measurable indicator of person-centered care, through an overview of three tools (Preferences for Everyday Living – PELI; Eden Alternative Well-Being; and the Person-Directed Care Instrument for Staff). These tools were designed to more objectively measure gaps and successes to support QOL, and each free tool offers unique methods and opportunities to integrate QOL measurement with person-centered practices in your organization to assure that residents are experiencing a life of value and happiness. 

Learning Objectives
  1. Identify three prominent, free tools designed to assess, measure and support quality of life (QOL) in nursing homes and other long-term care settings.
  2. Describe the best practices associated with each tool including tips on when and how these tools can be integrated into existing processes to promote QOL.
  3. Competently plan and implement the use of these tools in organizational efforts to champion, improve and measure quality of life in long-term care.
Presenters: Denise Hyde, Community Builder, The Eden Alternative; Diana White, PhD, Senior Research Associate, Portland State University, and Kimberly Van Haitsma, PhD, Associate Professor of Nursing and Director, Program for Person-Centered Living Systems of Care, Penn State University College of Nursing

Bio information

Denise Hyde, Pharm.D. discovered culture change in 1997 at the Thomas Fitzgerald Veterans Home in Omaha, Nebraska. She left the Veterans Home in 2001 and became a Regional Coordinator for The Eden Alternative supporting six states. In 2005, Denise was hired by the Quality Improvement Organization in Nebraska to do culture change work and Medicare Part D projects. She is now serving as the Community Builder for The Eden Alternative supporting Eden Registry Members. Denise is one of the founding members of the culture change coalition in Nebraska and has spoken several times on culture change locally and nationally.


Diana White, PhD, is a senior research associate at the Institute on Aging at Portland State University. She works on a variety of education and evaluation projects, including projects related to long-term services and supports. Dr. White and her colleagues developed an instrument to assess person-directed care from the perspective of staff working in nursing homes, assisted living, and residential care settings as part of the Oregon Better Jobs Better Care demonstration project. She is currently developing and validating the Person-Directed Care Instrument for Residents, which is being developed in nursing homes, assisted living, residential care, and adult foster care. Dr. White serves on the Making Oregon Vital for Elders Steering Committee, that state's culture change coalition. 

  
Kimberly Van Haitsma, PhD, has worked in long term care settings for over 35 years. During that time she has had many roles including nursing assistant, clinical geropsychologist, health services researcher, as well as family caregiver. She recently took a position at Penn State University's College of Nursing as the Director for the Program for Person Centered Living Systems of Care. In this position, she is pursuing a lifelong passion to advance the science of person centered care, create evidence based education and intervention approaches and assessment tools, and translate those evidence based approaches into "real world" settings of care. The goal of these efforts is to enable providers to deliver evidence based high quality care that is focused around fulfilling the older adult's preferences for every living; thus making it possible for older adults to flourish and achieve well-being.